History of the Flapper Dress

History of the Flapper Dress

History of the Flapper Dress

History of the Flapper Dress In 1930, the first flapper dress was introduced into the fashion industry by Mary Quantrelli. The flapper dress, originally called the “petticoat skirt” and more commonly called the “chiffon” dress, as it was originally made of very light material such as silk, satin or velvet, became extremely popular in many countries and at the time, was the most fashionable dress worn by women. This dress was in fashion from approximately 1930 through the late twenties and is known as the “Flamingo Dress”. As popularized in film images from the late twenties and early thirties, flappers were generally referred to as “little red rascals”.

History of the Flapper Dresses It was at this time that flappers became extremely fashionable and started to become a bit more feminine in their appearance. During the late twenties, flappers began to wear more elaborate and beautiful designs, which were not only in accordance with their own personality but also in keeping with the new trend in style and fashion. Many flappers adopted flapper clothes as an identity, and flappers began to dress like flappers in order to avoid being labeled as “punk”flamboyant”. The flapper dress became quite popular and became the dress of choice for women who were considered to be “out of the mainstream”.

Flapper dress had two separate but interrelated eras, the first being the Victorian age and the second being the post-war period. During the Victorian age, many flappers took part in the ball-room dances, in the Victorian style. These dances were often quite extravagant, which is why they were so popular in the thirties and later. The flapper dress of today was designed to look just as extravagant and glamorous as the dresses worn by the Victorian era flappers. Although today the flapper dress is not as heavily embellished as in the earlier times, flappers still wear dresses with great care and attention to detail.